Articles by members.

Write Club: An interdisciplinary writing group

The University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) is a young, regional university with a rapidly growing Higher Degree by Research (HDR) student cohort. Our cohort has developed at an accelerated rate in an environment with an ever-developing research capacity and increased regulatory and budgetary pressures. For universities, the creation of a research community is not…

On the Prowl: Predatory Conferences and Publishers

“I’m a bit worried about something, and I need your advice.” My good friend, Ariana*, had submitted papers to two international conferences. Each of these conferences promised opportunities to engage with experts in her field, comprehensive peer-review processes for all paper submissions, and were to be hosted in two world cities – Paris, France and…

Reflections on Art/Law

By Sean Mulcahy Tom Nicholson’s Towards a Monument to Batman’s Treaty was the artwork for the 2017 Conference of the Law, Literature and Humanities Association of Australasia. The installation, which comprised strewn chimney bricks surrounded by possible memorial plaques, was strangely fitting. The as-yet-unrealised nature of the work, with its strewn materials and multiple possible…

Responding to Repetition: Professor Marianne Constable’s Keynote @LawLitHum2017

By Rachel Bolton, PhD Candidate: UTS Law Marianne Constable, Professor of Rhetoric at Berkeley, gave a keynote lecture at the 2017 Conference of the Law Literature and Humanities Association of Australasia held in Melbourne 12-14 December. Titled “Subversive Legacies: Law, Literature and Repetition”, Constable’s keynote aimed to bring attention to the work of repetition. Her…

Showcasing Law and Humanities Students: ‘True Detective, s1: What Would Nietzsche Do?’

Honours students at the Griffith Law School have the opportunity to complete a designated Cultural Legal Studies elective that introduces students to the theories and methods of law and humanities scholarship.  As part of the course, students engage in an intertextual analysis of law and a text of their choosing, including novels, poems, films, television shows, music videos, and graphic novels,…

A contract to entertain

As you’ll know if you attended, the LawLitHum Conference 2015: Complicities, held at UTS in December, was a great success. We asked the recipients of three RHD student bursaries to offer their reflections on the event. Here’s what James Stewart (Adelaide Law School) had to say: Within my broader research area of Critical Legal Studies, the…

Interdisciplinary Complicity

As you’ll know if you attended, the LawLitHum Conference 2015: Complicities, held at UTS in December, was a great success. We asked the recipients of two RHD student bursaries to offer their reflections on the event. Here’s what Ben Eldridge (University of Sydney) had to say: The death of rigor in general public discourse should…

Wordless: Spiegelman and the Aesthetics and Ethics of the Graphic Novel

Law and humanities scholarship is interested in how we engage with texts as readers, spectators, listeners, judges, lawyers and critics—and how this has jurisprudential effect. The formal properties of literature, art, photographs, theatre or legal judgment invite particular modes of engagement, engender certain perspectives, and encourage specific forms of relation. A form which holds significant…